air talk

Find and post all your Civil and Military HF, VHF & UHF Frequencies Here

air talk

Postby stanogs68 » Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:30 pm

do you not agree that the aeroplanes speak so fast its hard to uderstand ,can we ask them to speak slowly haha :walkietalkie:
stanogs68
 
Posts: 252
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 5:31 pm

Re: air talk

Postby milly » Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:36 pm

I've yet to hear an aeroplane speak. Your hearing may well be better than mine.
milly
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 8:59 am

Re: air talk

Postby thelad » Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:39 pm

thelad
 
Posts: 894
Joined: Thu Dec 06, 2012 9:30 pm

Re: air talk

Postby Nighthawk999 » Mon Feb 06, 2017 4:52 pm

stanogs68 wrote:do you not agree that the aeroplanes speak so fast its hard to uderstand ,can we ask them to speak slowly haha :walkietalkie:

Surprisingly,they are NOT talking for your benefit!The very nature of ATC dictates that conversations need to be brief.
Nighthawk999
 
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2015 11:45 am
Location: West Leicester near city centre

Re: air talk

Postby Giblets » Mon Feb 06, 2017 5:53 pm

I have recently spoken to both a serving airline pilot and a recently retired NATS chap on just this subject. They both have said that the speed of the verbal exchange is quite normal and gets all the required information across in the shortest possible time bearing in mind there are many different aircraft being handled at the same time. If any info is missed then either the pilot or the controller will request a repeat which very rarely happens.
Giblets
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2016 12:54 pm

Re: air talk

Postby thelad » Mon Feb 06, 2017 6:43 pm

I have no issue understanding most of it.
thelad
 
Posts: 894
Joined: Thu Dec 06, 2012 9:30 pm

Re: air talk

Postby G4RMT » Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:20 pm

Brevity and speed are essential. Even worse with military as they use far more very specific jargon. Ham band contests are even worse. Good news is that it becomes easier as you listen more and more. It helps to read some pilot training manuals to understand all the acronyms and abbreviations. Q code, pressure settings, waypoints, and other very common but complex components then start to make sense. when it is just a jumble of words it is gibberish, but once you start to recognise the little chunks making up the message, it falls into place. You can then start to understand the apparent politeness that is often disguised annoyance when things go wrong.
G4RMT
 
Posts: 932
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2015 5:45 pm

Re: air talk

Postby m0lsx » Mon Feb 06, 2017 11:14 pm

G4RMT wrote: It helps to read some pilot training manuals to understand all the acronyms and abbreviations. Q code, pressure settings, waypoints, and other very common but complex components then start to make sense. when it is just a jumble of words it is gibberish, but once you start to recognise the little chunks making up the message, it falls into place. You can then start to understand the apparent politeness that is often disguised annoyance when things go wrong.


I found several airband (Scanner) books in a charity shop & found that buying them was a good buy. Not for the frequencies, which I already had, but for understanding what certain jargon meant & why it's used.
Amazon often has airband listening books available at good prices. So that could be another source of information.
Buy a database from Kimmy JS19 via http://ukscanningdirectory.co.uk/
Or do Google search of this forum via https://www.google.com/cse/home?cx=partner-pub-6291336405621919:2662881632
73 De Alan (M0LSX.)
http://www.qrz.com/db/M0LSX"
User avatar
m0lsx
 
Posts: 5007
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:14 pm
Location: Norwich. TG21.

Re: air talk

Postby lars » Tue Feb 07, 2017 8:18 am

There's a heap of training stuff for pilots, available on-line and elsewhere. In my own (amateur) flying days I found speaking to the ground controllers absolutely terrifying. It certainly helps to understand the terminology -- which I guess any pilot will -- but the speed of delivery takes some getting used to. I used to fly out of Elstree where things were a bit more relaxed -- sometimes they would use whole sentences. The Gatwick TMA is a different world entirely. In the end, I think you just have to listen for hours and hours to tune your ear/brain to this mode of conversation.
lars
 
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2016 9:03 am

Re: air talk

Postby Giblets » Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:45 am

Also handy to have Planefinder https://planefinder.net/ showing on the pooter at the same time with the a/c call signs displayed. :biggrin:
Giblets
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2016 12:54 pm

Next

Return to Airband Air Frequencies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests