Handheld radio any good

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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby ilikeradios » Thu Feb 18, 2016 9:26 am

Just a thought but where did you see the Yaesu model FT20 ?
The nearest I can find is the FT2D (comes in e and r variants). This is a 144Mhz(2 metre) and 433Mhz (70 cm) hand held Digital/FM transceiver
http://www.hamradio.co.uk/amateur-radio ... d-5695.php
Was it this one you meant?
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby G4RMT » Thu Feb 18, 2016 9:41 am

Sorry - I only just realised it was you who started the other topic. I'll continue there.
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby stanogs68 » Thu Feb 18, 2016 11:51 am

No worries thanks
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby m0lsx » Thu Feb 18, 2016 11:57 am

stanogs68 wrote:I want to learn how too talk to people on radio like cba but getting further and then learning the different directions you can go with it


If what you want is to be able to talk to people like on CB, then without a CB or other licence free radio you will be breaking the law if you talk to someone via a radio.
CB is the longest distance no licence required radio in the UK & SSB is legal on CB now.
I regularly work into the New York repeater on 10 meters using 10 watts or less of FM into a compromise multi band antenna. So with a no compromise CB antenna you should manage better than that.
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby stanogs68 » Thu Feb 18, 2016 2:02 pm

I know about that I was talking about joining the local club and getting my licences as well as learning about radio
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby m0lsx » Thu Feb 18, 2016 5:10 pm

Listen around your local amateur radio frequencies, you will start to get an idea of what is happening locally & how people talk.
Personally I avoid repeaters like the plague. They are too much like CB & Taxi frequencies for me. But some are better (or worse) than others.
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby stanogs68 » Sat Feb 20, 2016 8:16 pm

What is a repeater ?
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby G4RMT » Sat Feb 20, 2016 8:38 pm

Blimey Stan - you have piles of reading to do!

walkie talkies and mobiles in vehicles rarely have the oomph to actually get very far. People buy a couple of hand held radios, and then complain because they can't get from one end of the road to the other. The problem is simply power and topography. Small aerials are not that efficient and range is a problem. Stick an aerial up in the air, clear of the ground and because the earth is curved, and obstacles are rarely so much of a problem, this aerial can hear your weak signals, and you can hear it, because it will probably also be fairly potent, power wise.

A repeater is two radios in one box. A receiver, and a transmitter. It listens on frequency A, and transmits on another - whatever it hears, goes out again.You simply set your radio to transmit on the repeater's receive frequency (the input) and to listen on the repeater's transit frequency (the output). On the map, the receiver coverage is an area with the repeater in the middle. Anybody within range can get into it and talk to anyone else. It's a simple way to get much better range. Commercial and amateur repeaters exist. Usually, you set your radio to send out a sub-audible tone (CTCSS - if you want to Google) and when the repeater hears this tone, it switches on. When you let go the button - it switches off again. Repeaters for amateurs will be UHF or VHF bands, and the VHF ones tend to cover perhaps an entire county, while UHF ones tend to be slightly smaller in coverage area. They don't have to be, but in practice seem that way.

Commercial radio repeaters can often rebroadcast multiple users, which they usually pay for. One user might use tone 1, while another user uses tone 2 and so on. They can't talk at the same time, but commercial users done chat for long.

Most repeaters depend on the height to generate coverage. My repeater has a range of around 6 miles, and is very low powered because my clients are all very local. The Amateur repeater in Lowestoft is on top of a tower block, and has a coverage area, on roughly the same power as me of getting on for 30 miles in some directions. So somebody in their car ten miles from Ipswich can probably talk to somebody on the way to Cromer - over 50 miles as the crow (and RF) flies. Impossible without the repeater.

This is also why sometimes newcomers generate a few sniggers when they send QSL cards to confirm a repeater contact - they didn't do the work, the repeater did!

That's a bit of a condensed summary on how they work - as in practice it's a bit more complex with many technical issues to be managed.
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby stanogs68 » Sat Feb 20, 2016 10:27 pm

Cheers for that I sought of understand ,I've been looking on googles to get as much knowledge as I can get ,I admit I keno idea but I'm willing to learn and am a good learner just its seems everyone who knows about radios can not be bothered to give any one the time too help them out ,that's why am bothered about joining a club they might think I'm not worth telling ,is there any good reading were I can grasp the basics cheers
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Re: Handheld radio any good

Postby G4RMT » Sat Feb 20, 2016 10:58 pm

Stan - you're from the old school. Nothing wrong with it, but you're clearly somebody who learns best by being told things. Younger people tend to learn by what's called kinaesthetic - touchy-feely. A 4 year old can pick up an iPad or phone and use it competently to play games or use the phone, even if they cannot read instructions. Older people, as a generalisation, were originally taught by the shut up, sit still and listen technique, and got used to it. Doing research via Google is often very difficult simply because they are not used to picking search terms that work and then speed reading and sifting.

The club will, I suspect, be the best route Stan - and almost certainly the club will have two types of members - the young, quick and easily bored, and the older members who take things much more steadily. I have never found a club with only one type of member. Get yourself down there and see!

Digital modes, I think, for you - should come later. Perhaps even not at all. I think you have a radio, or scanner? Use Google to find amateur repeaters, and have a listen. See if you identify with what you hear. Some repeaters are populated by quite specific groups. Maybe the VHF one has older people and the UHF younger, or maybe it's split by the time of day. The Norwich VHF repeater of 20 years ago during the day was full of TV engineers, using it on the way to the next jobs. As a result, the chat was frequently technical in nature, and at the time, much was above my head. Other repeaters are just like CB - people talking about rubbish - but just friends. I can't explain the social side really. I rarely use a repeater locally an longer. I don't have much in common with the current users. I did return to my old club that I went to each week, last year - but that was my only visit. Just not for me any longer. Too set in my ways I guess. Back in the 80s, there was even rivalry between clubs - Lowestoft often entered the contests and got hammered by the Gt Yarmouth people, 9 miles away who always seemed to do better and get further!

Visit the club and see what you think.
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