Bench Equipment advice

Everything Ham Radio in here, Frequencies, Equipment, Repairs, Mods, Licensing and More

Bench Equipment advice

Postby Richie_asg1 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:04 pm

I have been repairing various products that come across my bench for a few years now, and learned a lot from repair of CB transceivers. I really enjoy the challenge and think the immersion technique of just getting in there and testing testing testing really helps you understand how each stage works - or often fails.

I'm not afraid of SMT boards either and have successfully reworked some very small faults.

I have stayed away from the "random twiddling" because I just don't have the equipment to fully determine things like moduation envelope - but I would like to be able to peak a set that I have got working but is slightly down on power, and do it properly.

I have a 20Mhz scope and basic frequency counter, 50 ohm dummy load, decent combined SWR & Wattmeter, but a rather old book is requesting a RF Wattmeter and a signal generator with the capability to add noise or modulated tone. :huh:

Things have moved on a bit since the 70's when the book was written, so is there a modern version of these two? And would anything else be needed or useful?

Thank you for any help.
Richard.
M6AGL
User avatar
Richie_asg1
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:22 pm

Re: Bench Equipment advice

Postby lars » Mon Nov 20, 2017 1:01 pm

I'm not sure this kind of technology has changed much since the 70s, and I'd still be looking to get a decent signal generator if I was going to do a lot of this kind of tinkering. At my age, one thing that would definitely be on the shopping list, if I was doing a lot of tinkering with mains-powered equipment, is an isolating transformer, to reduce the risk of shocks.
lars
 
Posts: 152
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2016 9:03 am

Re: Bench Equipment advice

Postby Richie_asg1 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 10:52 am

Fortunately I have read several books on repair and was educated on IEE electrical regs at one point, along with working industrially as a spark so know to keep my hands out of there with power on, but you are right you cannot be too careful so is worth mentioning. :thumbup: Isolation transformers give you some degree of safety - but only if you use one hand. Fortunately 95% of what I work with is 12v and below, but you still need to be aware of large electrolytics -especially with inverter designs that can happily hold onto 300v.

I am currently looking for a signal generator with the ability to add 'fuzz'. :happy:
User avatar
Richie_asg1
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:22 pm


Return to Amateur Radio

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest