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Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:21 pm
by Paulf
Hi everyone. Just got a dmr radio tyt md2017
I used to listen to analogue a lot but left it for a long time. But it's all digital as you all know. Just wanting to know if anyone has frequencys with colour codes if needed that could pass on to me to help me get started back up. Anything would be appreciated.

Glasgow area mostly but others are welcome

Thanks again.

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 7:22 pm
by Throbber
For a simpleton, what are the "Colour Codes" about ?

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:04 pm
by G4RMT
Well - with digital, there are loads of extra facilities - and some are similar to analogue where we have CTCSS and DTS tones that prevent radios perking up when the wrong tone is received - that way people can share channels unaware of the other. Obviously there's just one person able to talk at one time, so some clashes occur. In digital systems (and this will be very confusing) there is the facility to do something similar but with digital codes rather than tones. The stupidest thing is that the colour codes are actually numbers, so CC11 is not a colour at all. Normally 0 to 14. It's just a system to allow people to have a bit more privacy - a workers group, a supervisors group and maybe a bosses group, or physical locations - the workshop people on 1, offices on 2 and dispatch on 3 etc.

However - we do not normally publish frequencies and the CC details. The hobby is in a dangerous state, and many users of new digital systems believe their comms are secure. If we publish the frequencies AND the CC details then anyone on the net can listen in, and worse, join in! Some forums will publish the info, but we believe doing it encourages users to start to use encryption, which we cannot then listen into. People disagree on this, but OFCOM publish licence frequencies, and it's not a hard job to discover the CC they are using yourself. Slapping it up for the whole world just encourages people to encrypt, which kills the hobby. If you publish CC details the pods usually delete them. We understand you want them, but as radios are generally programmed from a computer, it takes little effort to stick them all in and see which one works. This is just how this forum works, and in general, I think it's our little bit for the scanning community. Others disagree. This is fine, m but CC codes here are not what the majority want, or of course the forum owners, m who set the rules we follow.

So to recap - in analogue, you set a frequency and enter 98.3Hz or whatever which shuts your radio up when it hears things that will annoy the users. For listeners, of course, CTCSS is pointless as we want to hear everything. With digital, you won't hear anything without the correct colour code set.

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:20 am
by Minus1
Colour codes are just the digital equivalent of CTCSS/DCS on analog.

The belief by some people that Colour Codes should not be published, is quite frankly barking.
I think it is routed in a fundamental misunderstanding of what "code" means.
They seem to think is means encryption and therefore is top secret.
I think they should buy a dictionary and read it.

Sadly there are control freaks (people who think they the right to tell you what to do) in every aspect of life. :rolleyes:

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:54 pm
by Paulf
I understand about not wanting to share to much. I'm just starting to get back into listing to frequencys. But it's all changed so I'm new to this than analogue. I was just told to listen to stuff you need the right cc codes too as it's not as simple to listen in as before.

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:59 pm
by thelad
You need the correct mode, CC, Slot and Tg unless using hacked firmware. I would say get your self a SDR stick, nice and cheap with SDR sharp and Dsd software then let the pc work all the info you need and then make a codeplug for the radio.

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 9:21 am
by Minus1
Paulf wrote:I was just told to listen to stuff you need the right cc codes too as it's not as simple to listen in as before.


Most scanners will detect all this stuff.
So you do not NEED them - having the info just saves you time finding them yourself.

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:06 pm
by m0lsx
Minus1 wrote: Most scanners will detect all this stuff.
So you do not NEED them - having the info just saves you time finding them yourself.


The problem is far too many people asking for information here are not using scanners, but transceivers. So potentially any information they get from here could end up being used to deliberately cause these users problems.
We also have a high number of users who pop up & just make one or two posts at the most. But only posts asking for information.

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 6:48 pm
by Paulf
thelad wrote:You need the correct mode, CC, Slot and Tg unless using hacked firmware. I would say get your self a SDR stick, nice and cheap with SDR sharp and Dsd software then let the pc work all the info you need and then make a codeplug for the radio.

Thanks sounds much better. Just us d to old analogue stuff I'm only getting back into it now but so much has changed. I used this site for a long time but never made an account as I never needed to ask anything untill now. Thanks

Re: Dmr frequencys

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 7:09 pm
by m0lsx
Paulf wrote: Thanks sounds much better. Just us d to old analogue stuff I'm only getting back into it now but so much has changed. I used this site for a long time but never made an account as I never needed to ask anything untill now. Thanks


Think about a dongle, they can be brought cheaply & run with DSD which not only does a lot of the hard work for you, but it is freeware too. So not just cheap, but free.
The only thing I would say is. Dongles are not plug & play. They do take a bit of setting up & don't place too much faith in the frequencies shown, as they can be out by a few khz.