Effect of weather on local repeater reception

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Effect of weather on local repeater reception

Postby lars » Wed Jun 22, 2016 5:15 pm

Hi folks

Should I expect the weather to affect the quality of reception of voice communication from local UHF/VHF repeaters? I'm aware that sure things are of great importance in HF communications, but I wasn't expecting UHF/VHF to be affected. However, I find that both the number repeaters I can receive, and the quality of the signal, vary with weather.

Thanks
Lars
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Re: Effect of weather on local repeater reception

Postby ACL » Mon Jul 04, 2016 10:11 pm

Absolutely, with high pressure signals travel further outside of their natural/intended range. When conditions are good I can receive many continental repeaters. However when low pressure dominates which tends to be the norm for this country I can only receive local and semi local repeaters .
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Re: Effect of weather on local repeater reception

Postby G4RMT » Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:34 am

In the coastal districts it was really common in the summer for many of the repeaters to be unusable because somebody in Holland would be working through both GB3YL AND GB3CE - both sharing a channel, and when conditions were up, which they were a lot in the 70s and 80s with the nice summers, there would be repeaters on lots of normally silent frequencies. As they all came up with a 1750Hz tone, whistle one up and taking your finger off the button was often a shock. With a nice beam on the roof, repeater hunting was almost a hobby in itself. Trouble is these conditions are very dependent on certain types of weather - humidity and temperature inversions being critical. Google tropospheric ducting - for info on one amazing type of lift condition.
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Re: Effect of weather on local repeater reception

Postby ACL » Tue Jul 05, 2016 7:25 pm

G4RMT wrote:In the coastal districts it was really common in the summer for many of the repeaters to be unusable because somebody in Holland would be working through both GB3YL AND GB3CE - both sharing a channel, and when conditions were up, which they were a lot in the 70s and 80s with the nice summers, there would be repeaters on lots of normally silent frequencies. As they all came up with a 1750Hz tone, whistle one up and taking your finger off the button was often a shock. With a nice beam on the roof, repeater hunting was almost a hobby in itself. Trouble is these conditions are very dependent on certain types of weather - humidity and temperature inversions being critical. Google tropospheric ducting - for info on one amazing type of lift condition.


Very interesting. I'd say repeater hunting on 2m is my favourite hobby. A few weeks back though the tropospheric enhancements were so strong that on certain frequencies I was receiving three repeaters. The co-channeling made it impossible to hear anything.
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