Humber Coastguard

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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby ACL » Sun Aug 21, 2016 4:01 pm

I spent yesterday in Winterton and saw plenty of aerials on the coast guard shack by the Dune Cafe.
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby m0lsx » Sun Aug 21, 2016 6:07 pm

ACL wrote:I spent yesterday in Winterton and saw plenty of aerials on the coast guard shack by the Dune Cafe.



http://www.seasafetygroup.org/page5.html

http://www.winterton-on-sea.net/coastwatch.html

https://vimeo.com/115847698
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby G4RMT » Sun Aug 21, 2016 7:31 pm

Well - the coastguard lookout I have in my memory was demolished years ago, but the mast in the pictures is current. It has an 8 dipole (actually 7 and a half as one dipole has fell off) DF array on the top. On top is what appears to be a coil loaded groundplane, but the expected vertical element appears to be missing - the coil section is not that big so I can't see that being the radiator?

There are two marine band dipoles one at the top and one lower down and one vertical that could be a receive antenna for possibly the location data?

In the docks area is also another mast - but this one is well known locally for causing car park misery. It's a nav/location system and when it fails, it puts out a signal in the amateur 70cm band, and desenses all the car alarm systems so people cannot get into their cars when parked locally. It's done it twice now and Ofcom know all about it. Further north than the marine band mast is a similar height mast next to an old gasholder, but this is UHF data links.

Seems likely that ch23 comes from the DF mast, with perhaps channel 16 on the other dipole?

I've knocked up a map that has the troublesome nav mast marked in red, the marine mast in blue and the gas mast in yellow.
Image
Image
Image
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Last edited by G4RMT on Sun Aug 21, 2016 8:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby ACL » Sun Aug 21, 2016 8:33 pm

Thanks for the links. Great stuff.
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby ACL » Sun Aug 21, 2016 8:37 pm

G4RMT wrote:Well - the coastguard lookout I have in my memory was demolished years ago, but the mast in the pictures is current. It has an 8 dipole (actually 7 and a half as one dipole has fell off). On top is what appears to be a coil loaded groundplane, but the expected vertical element appears to be missing - the coil section is not that big so I can't see that being the radiator?

There are two marine band dipoles one at the top and one lower down and one vertical that could be a receive antenna for possibly the location data?

In the docks area is also another mast - but this one is well known locally for causing car park misery. It's a nav/location system and when it fails, it puts out a signal in the amateur 70cm band, and desenses all the car alarm systems so people cannot get into their cars when parked locally. It's done it twice now and Ofcom know all about it. Further north than the marine band mast is a similar height mast next to an old gasholder, but this is UHF data links.

Seems likely that ch23 comes from the DF mast, with perhaps channel 16 on the other dipole?

I've knocked up a map that has the troublesome nav mast marked in red, the marine mast in blue and the gas mast in yellow.
Image
Image
Image
Image

Great pictures and some interesting information. I couldn't find out any info although I don't know Lowestoft that well.
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby G4RMT » Thu Aug 25, 2016 8:27 am

Two spare days, sitting on yellow lines for probably 5 hours outside the entrance to SLP being quizzed by security guards as to why I was there every time they changed shift, with radios, analysers and counters and not a peep from ch 16 or 23! No Maritime safety broadcasts at any of the advertised times - so a bit fruitless. paperwork wise, I did note the official documents now itemise Lowestoft and Caister as the ch 23 sites, no longer Yarmouth, so the ch 23 mystery will remain one till I have more time to waste. Perhaps just nothing to broadcast?
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby ACL » Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:09 pm

Is there an up to date broadcast schedule. I found one online that said CH 23 and CH 86 should have been on at 19.50. I gave it a couple of minutes but there was no transmission.
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby G4RMT » Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:46 pm

They're bad at that - I spent one entire day trying to catch one, and none were when advertised. probably be OK tomorrow.
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby ACL » Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:54 pm

Thanks. I have my radio set up on CH 86,161.925 from Caister and CH 23, 161.750 from Trimingham . Just one last question why does each channel have two frequencies? I know the lower frequencies are ship stations but what does this mean? Only coastguards on land can give maritime safety and weather transmissions. When and why would the lower "ship" frequency for that channel be used?
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Re: Humber Coastguard

Postby G4RMT » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:49 am

In days gone by, these frequencies were duplex to allow people on ships to receive telephone calls! The shore stations, (operated by BT )and the Post Office before them) would call a ship, find the person the call was for then the person on the phone would go out over one frequency, and the person on the ship could transmit back. Not like real telephone of course, but the person at home could speak normally, and they could interrupt from the boat, but at the ship end, obviously they can not hear when talking, unlike on shore. This was pretty well the only way ships could do comms with the outside world. Now that this service isn't used any longer - these duplex channels are largely unused, but Coastguard still uses them. If for any reason a ship tried to respond to a call on these channels, it would not disrupt anyone listening, as the TX frequency is different, as you have noted. Internationally (including the US) duplex channels are nowhere near as active as they used to be before cell phones. If you apply for a Maritime Coastal Station license, you can still have dual frequency operation if you wish. I think the connection to the phone system is still allowed too, but rarely used. If you hear anyone ask for a phone patch, this is what they are talking about - full duplex on shore, semi-duplex offshore.

I had to drive all the way to Mablethorpe from Lowestoft to one of these BT stations in 1980 to take the Morse Code test. Building on a high point near a cliff, with lots of aerials, and a pub next door.
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